Mac and Windows PC Fonts

 

postscript type 1 outline font

PostScript font formats Adobe Type 1 fonts are stored in two common formats,.pfa (PostScript Font ASCII) gandrago.ml (PostScript Font Binary). These contain descriptions of the character shapes, with each character being generated by a small program that calls on other small programs to compute common parts of the characters in the font. Adobe's Font Development Kit is a free download available for the Mac and Windows. It has tools that can convert older font files to Opentype. It has tools that can convert older font files to Opentype. I use Adobe Postscript Type 1 fonts regularly in my documents, and I have found that Word (and presumably all of the Office applications) has several problems working with PostScript fonts. Most notably, the "Save as PDF" function will create documents with an odd gradient effect applied to all PostScript fonts.


PostScript Type 1 fonts


Adobe Type 1 fonts are stored in two common formats. These contain descriptions of the character shapes, postscript type 1 outline font, with each character postscript type 1 outline font generated by a small program that calls on other small programs to compute common parts of the characters in the font.

In both cases, the character descriptions are encrypted. Before such a font can be used, it must be rendered into dots in a bitmap, either by the PostScript interpreter, or by a specialized rendering engine, such as Adobe Type Manager, which is used to generate low-resolution screen fonts on Apple Macintosh and on Microsoft Windows systems.

The Type 1 outline files do not contain sufficient information for typesetting with the font, because they have only limited metric data, and nothing about kerning position adjustments of particular adjacent characters or ligatures replacement of adjacent characters by a single character glyph, those for fi, ffi, fl, and ffl being most common in English typography.

This missing information is supplied in additional files, called. Some font vendors, such as Adobe, allow them to be freely distributed; others, postscript type 1 outline font as Bitstream, consider them to be restricted by a font license which must be purchased.

PostScript printers generally contain from a dozen to a hundred fonts in, postscript type 1 outline font. However, none that I'm aware of contain the. In case you are interested in seeing what these files look like, here are some sample font files in the formats described above, using the Nimbus Roman No9 L Regular font visually identical to Times Roman kindly released for free public use by URW Software, one of the veteran font vendors. For the binary. The t1utils font utility package by I.

Lee Hetherington and Piet Tutelaers provides tools for decoding Type 1 fonts into a human-readable, and editable format t1disasmreassembling them back into fonts t1asmfor converting between the ASCII and binary formats t1ascii and t1binaryand for converting from Macintosh PostScript format to Adobe PostScript font format unpost.

Commercial font editors, such as Fontographercan read and write Type 1 font files.

 

Postscript type 1 outline fonts | Typophile

 

postscript type 1 outline font

 

Type 1 fonts. Type 1 is a font format which came to market around , together with PostScript and the Apple LaserWriter. This is the reason why the font format is sometimes called PostScript Type 1, even though you can also print these fonts on non-PostScript devices since the early nineties. PostScript font formats Adobe Type 1 fonts are stored in two common formats,.pfa (PostScript Font ASCII) gandrago.ml (PostScript Font Binary). These contain descriptions of the character shapes, with each character being generated by a small program that calls on other small programs to compute common parts of the characters in the font. So now there are two widely used outline font specifications, one (TrueType) built into the operating systems used by over 95% of computers world-wide, and the other (PostScript Type 1) both well-established and supported directly by most high-end output devices. But as time goes on, the practical differences begin to blur.