Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) - gandrago.ml

 

articles on ocd

From hoarding to handwashing to forever checking the stove, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) takes many forms. It is an anxiety disorder that traps people in repetitive thoughts and behavioral. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a mental disorder in which people experience unwanted and repeated thoughts, feelings, images, or sensations (obsessions) and engage in behaviors or mental. Oct 13,  · In the film “As Good As It Gets,” Jack Nicholson portrays Melvin Udall, a middle-aged man with obsessive-compulsive disorder who avoids stepping on cracks, locks doors and flips light switches exactly five times, and washes his hands repeatedly, each time tossing out the new bar of soap he used. He brings wrapped plastic utensils to the diner where he eats breakfast at the same table.


Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders - Elsevier


But if you suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder OCDobsessive thoughts and compulsive articles on ocd become so consuming they interfere with your daily life. OCD is an anxiety disorder characterized by uncontrollable, unwanted thoughts and ritualized, repetitive behaviors you feel compelled to perform. If you have OCD, you probably recognize that your obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviors are irrational—but even so, you feel unable to resist them and break free.

Like a needle getting stuck on an old record, OCD causes the brain to get stuck on a particular thought or urge. You may try to avoid situations that trigger or worsen your symptoms or self-medicate with alcohol or drugs.

Obsessions are involuntary thoughts, images, or impulses that occur over and over again in your mind. Unfortunately, these obsessive thoughts are often disturbing and distracting.

Compulsions are behaviors or rituals that you feel driven to act out again and again. Usually, compulsions are performed in an attempt to make obsessions go away. However, the relief never lasts, articles on ocd. In fact, the obsessive thoughts usually come back stronger. And the compulsive rituals and behaviors often end up causing anxiety themselves as they become more demanding and time-consuming.

This is the vicious cycle of OCD. Just because you have obsessive thoughts or perform compulsive behaviors does NOT mean that you have obsessive-compulsive disorder, articles on ocd. With OCD, these thoughts and behaviors cause tremendous distress, take up a lot of time at least one hour per dayarticles on ocd, and interfere with your daily articles on ocd and relationships.

Most people with obsessive-compulsive disorder have both obsessions and compulsions, but some people experience just one or the other. While the onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder usually occurs during adolescence or young adulthood, younger children sometimes have symptoms that look like OCD, articles on ocd.

The first step to managing your OCD symptoms is to recognize the triggers—the thoughts or situations—that bring on your obsessions and compulsions. Record a list of the triggers you experience each day and the obsessions they provoke. Rate the intensity of the fear or anxiety you experienced in each situation and then the compulsions or mental strategies you used to ease your anxiety.

For example, if you have a fear of being contaminated by germs, touching a railing articles on ocd the mall might generate a fear intensity of 3, whereas touching the restroom floor in the mall might generate a 10 and require 15 minutes of hand washing to ease your anxiety.

Keeping track of your triggers can help you anticipate your urges. And by anticipating your compulsive urges before they arise, you can help articles on ocd ease them, articles on ocd.

For example, if your compulsive behavior involves checking that doors are locked, windows closed, or appliances turned off, try to lock the door or turn off the appliance with extra attention the first time. Identifying articles on ocd recording your triggers also provides an important tool for learning to resist your OCD compulsions. It might seem smart to avoid the situations that trigger your obsessive thoughts, but the more you avoid them, articles on ocd, the scarier they feel.

Conversely, by repeatedly exposing yourself to your OCD triggers, you can learn to resist the urge to complete your compulsive rituals. If you are a compulsive hand washer, for example, articles on ocd, that could mean touching the door handle in a public restroom and then not allowing yourself to wash your hands, articles on ocd. As you sit with the anxiety, the urge to wash your hands will gradually begin to go away on its own.

Building your fear ladder. Using the information you recorded in identifying your triggers, make a list of situations from the least scary to the most scary. Work your way up the ladder. If possible, stay in the situation long enough for your anxiety to decrease.

If a step is articles on ocd hard, break it down into smaller steps or go slower. Articles on ocd of trying to distract yourself, allow yourself to feel anxious as you resist the urge to engage in your compulsive behavior. But if you stick with it, the anxiety will fade. The articles on ocd often you practice, the quicker your progress will be. Go at a pace that you can manage without feeling overwhelmed. And remember: you will feel uncomfortable and anxious as you face your fears, but the feelings are only temporary.

Everyone has troubling thoughts or worries from time to time. But obsessive-compulsive disorder causes the brain to get stuck on a particular anxiety-provoking thought, causing it to play over and over in your head. The more unpleasant or distressing the thought, the more likely you are to try to repress it, articles on ocd. But repressing thoughts is almost impossible and trying usually has the opposite effect, articles on ocd, causing the unpleasant thought to resurface more frequently and become more bothersome.

As with resisting compulsions, you can articles on ocd disturbing, obsessive thoughts by learning to tolerate them through exposure and response prevention exercises. Your thoughts articles on ocd just thoughts. The following strategies can help you see your thoughts for what they are and regain a sense of control over your anxious mind.

Write down your obsessive thoughts. Keep a pad and pencil on you, or type on a smartphone. When you begin to obsess, write down all your thoughts or compulsions. Create an OCD worry period. Rather than trying to suppress obsessions or compulsions, develop the habit of rescheduling them.

Challenge your obsessive thoughts. Use your worry period to challenge negative or intrusive thoughts by asking yourself:. Create a tape of your OCD obsessions or intrusive thoughts. Focus on one specific thought or obsession and record it to a tape recorder or smartphone. And just talking to an understanding person about your worries and urges can make them seem less threatening.

Stay connected to family and friends. Obsessions and compulsions can consume your life to the point of social isolation. In turn, social isolation will aggravate your OCD symptoms. Talking face-to-face articles on ocd your worries and urges can make them feel less real and less threatening, articles on ocd.

Join an OCD support group. OCD support groups enable you to both share your own experiences and learn from articles on ocd who are facing the same problems. Physical exercise and connecting with another person face-to-face are two very effective ways to calm your nervous system. You can also:. Quickly self-soothe and relieve anxiety symptoms by making use of one or more of your physical senses —sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste—or movement. You might try listening to a favorite piece of articles on ocd, looking at a treasured photo, savoring a cup of tea, or stroking a pet.

Practice relaxation techniques. Mindful meditation, yoga, deep breathing, articles on ocd, and other relaxation techniques can help lower your overall stress and tension levels and help you manage your urges. For best results, try practicing a relaxation technique regularly. A healthy, balanced lifestyle plays a big role in easing anxiety and keeping OCD compulsions, fears, and worry at bay. Exercise regularly.

Exercise is a natural and effective anti-anxiety treatment that helps to control OCD symptoms by refocusing your mind when obsessive thoughts and compulsions arise. For maximum benefit, try to get 30 minutes or more of aerobic activity on most days. Ten minutes several times a day can be as effective as one longer period especially if you pay mindful attention to the movement process. Get enough sleep.

Not only can anxiety and worry cause insomnia, but a lack of sleep can also exacerbate anxious thoughts and feelings.

Avoid alcohol articles on ocd nicotine. Alcohol temporarily reduces anxiety and worry, but it actually causes anxiety symptoms as it wears off. Similarly, articles on ocd, while it may seem that cigarettes are calming, nicotine is actually a powerful stimulant. Smoking leads to higher, not lower, levels of anxiety and OCD symptoms. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the most effective treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder and generally involves two components:.

Antidepressants are sometimes used in conjunction with therapy for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder. However, medication alone is rarely effective in relieving the articles on ocd. Family Therapy. Since OCD often causes problems in family life and social adjustment, family therapy can help promote understanding articles on ocd the disorder and reduce family conflicts.

It can also motivate family members and teach them how to help their loved one with OCD. Group Therapy. Through interaction with fellow OCD sufferers, group therapy provides support and encouragement and decreases feelings of isolation. In some people, OCD symptoms such as compulsive washing or hoarding are ways of coping with trauma. If you have post-traumatic OCD, cognitive approaches may not be effective until underlying traumatic issues are resolved.

Negative comments or criticism can make OCD worse, while a calm, articles on ocd, supportive environment can help improve the outcome of treatment. Avoid making personal criticisms. Be as kind and patient as possible.

Each sufferer needs to overcome problems at their own pace. Support the person, not their compulsions. Keep communication positive and clear. Communication is important so you can find a balance between supporting your loved one and standing up to the OCD symptoms and not further distressing your loved one.

Find the humor. Laughing together over the funny side and absurdity of some OCD symptoms can help your loved one become more detached from the disorder.

 

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder | Psychology Today

 

articles on ocd

 

From hoarding to handwashing to forever checking the stove, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) takes many forms. It is an anxiety disorder that traps people in repetitive thoughts and behavioral. Jul 06,  · Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a common, chronic and long-lasting disorder in which a person has uncontrollable, reoccurring thoughts (obsessions) and behaviors (compulsions) that he or she feels the urge to repeat over and over. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a type of anxiety gandrago.ml you have OCD, you have frequent, upsetting thoughts called obsessions. To try to control the thoughts, you feel an overwhelming urge to repeat certain rituals or behaviors.